Part II: The U.S. Post Office is Always Hiring (This is about the Census)

Down and out? Well, it’s not getting any better.  In a prior post I submitted the quote: : “After just two years as an associate at a small firm in the District, Williams was laid off in November 2008. She assumed she would land another job within four months. When that didn’t happen, her brother mentioned seeing an ad that the Census Bureau was hiring.” [The Washington Post Carol Morello, Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, March 8, 2010 [
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/03/07/AR2010030702886.html?hpid=topnews ]

Basically, everyone who’se overeducated and overqualified will be competing for a job that those who are less educated, more likely to stay longer and probably have little to no student loans will be applying for. Did you ever think that qualifying for a Census Bureau clerk position would become so competitive? Although I think it may be difficult (personal security) to be a census worker, but with a possible benefit of helping attorneys learn social and coping skills in dealing with others (something that’s not learned in law school); let’s face reality, it doesn’t take 2 to 3 degrees to fulfill the role. Look at this NPR article:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=125225460

Overeducated And Unemployed? Try The Census by Brian Naylor Check out NPR’s article

Ph.D. Turns Census Clerk  Herman Kopecek is a would-be college professor who has taught history, philosophy and business ethics. But with teaching jobs hard to find, Kopecek and his Ph.D. are now working for the census. His job title?

Clerk.

See there? The more degrees you have doesn’t equal higher employment, better lifestyle, better personal finances. And you guys still have the audacity to still apply to law school? What are you thinking (*smack to the left side of your head*).

For those you have been thinking of moving abroad, I suggest that you do your research and understand that you won’t be practicing law ‘there’ either. As many more are becoming aware, it is evident that e-discovery tools are the next step in streamlining discovery and reducing firms’ overhead. In England, the existence of too many lawyers is burdening the taxpayers (no mention of barristers or solicitors suffering for student loan debt though):

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1259926/Jack-Straw-says-Britain-lawyers.html

Britain has too many lawyers… says justice chief (and lawyer) Jack Straw

By Steve Doughty
So for those who actually been contemplating and qualify to practice law in England and likely the rest of Europe, well it may be wise to reconsider.

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3 Comments »

  1. JD Underdog Said:

    Post office isn’t a good option these days. I heard they’re cutting out Saturday delivery.

    Census positions are also hard to come by, especially for the field workers. You need to score a 28 of 28 on the test to have a shot at getting hired. When I scored a 25 of 28, I knew I had no chance. I took the test in mid February and I was supposed to hear back from someone mid March.

  2. Brutus, Esq. Said:

    There are too many cottn pickn degrees out there. That fact, which is the essence of the education bubble, was only disguised by the emergence of other bubbles – tech, housing etc.

    By the way, even as a black lawyer, if I were to choose one place to be an attorney, it’d be MD or DC. At least they have some contract work that pays decent rates +overtime. One of my boys has been on a contract down there for a while that pays very well. NJ and NYC suck in comparison.

    • A Law School Victim Said:

      Yes there are too many degrees, universities andgraduate schools, the proliferation of online degrees just inflates the bubble. Contract work= insane asylum which erodes the soul. Mostly foul-mouth, uncouthe backbiters. White women are more insidious. But both men and women do it but it’s especially acute among certain (black) women. Then again most people have issues, they just manifest it in different ways.


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