The Current Recession: Newsweek: The Race Gap in the Economic Recovery

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On June 15, 2010, I posted concerning continuous coverage of U.S. Black unemployment across all sectors. [See June 15, 2010: 

Unemployment Programs; Black Unemployment… «].  Here, the Economic Policy Institute provided statistics on black unemployment.  On June 18, 2010, Newsweek referencesInstitute on Assets and Social Policy (IASP): A Research Institute of the Heller School which conducted its own numerical study regarding wealth gap that Blacks and Hispanics confront with regards to the general economy.

Although it may be argued that these blogs are always attacking statistics of law schools and their alumn employment rates; these polls and statistics are different. One they involved different institutes and federal government agencies analyzing the financial data with personal/identifying information that must be including when filing for unemployment benefits. These institutes and agencies have no apparent financial benefit by boosting the numbers, it actually makes America and the system by which it operates by look pretty awful.

The gap between the accumulated wealth of white and black Americans (excluding home equity) stood at $20,000 in 1984; by 2007 it had grown to $95,000. “The growth of the racial wealth gap significantly affects the economic future of American families.  For example, the racial wealth gap in 1984 amounted to  less  than  three  years  tuition  payment  for  one  child  at  a  public  university.  By 2007, the dollar amount of the gap is enough to pay full tuition at a four year public university for two children, plus tuition at a public medical school,” the researchers wrote.

For Shapiro, such findings raise the question of whether America’s racial progress will collapse under the weight of financial insecurity.  It also makes him question whether public policy has been effectively employed.  In the aftermath of Katrina, he argues, there was an opportunity to undo the effect of generations of extreme residential segregation.  That opportunity, he says, was lost, as New Orleans recreated the segregation the hurricane had destroyed.  Now, he believes, we have another opportunity: to use tax and fiscal policy to create a more egalitarian society.” [emphasis mine] Umm I think we can conclude by various empirical evidence that it already has.

“The wrinkle, I point out, during our conversation, is that many Americans don’t see economic egalitarianism as a particular priority—or even as a desirable goal.At a time when so many are struggling, the idea of targeting minorities for special help seems a difficult notion to sell.” I’ll just insert a quote from John Howard Griffin’s book Black Like Me (p.44) : They put us low, and then blame us for being down there and say that since we are low, we can’t deserve our rights.”

You mean the average American citizen does not believe in equality or being treated fairly–doesn’t surprise me at all. Why does it have to be special help, just provide retroactive compensation for damages to those affected by discriminatory practices and ensure objective regulatory agencies that have experience and foresight in monitoring these occurrences. That’s the problem, the system creates the circumstances which causes certain target populations to be in situations that somehow have to be “resolved” instead of prevention or actual enforcement of laws that would protect them and treat them like the American they are. Instead, certain persons desire to carve out ‘special’ programs which implies these populations are defective and generally are unable to thrive, providing imagery to broader civic society that these populations are ‘a problem.’ Sounds like a set up. No, change the environment of racism by enforcement of the laws and you wouldn’t need special programs. It’ll probably save taxpayers money too.

With higher rates of undergraduate education, continued discrimination in both employment and lending practices, it makes sense for Black Americans to not attend law school. You’re worthy enough to contract debt such as mortgages with subprime rates though you had equal or better credit than your white counterpart (yes, there are published studies from the Federal Reserve and OPI regarding the mortgages issued to blacks, whites and hispanics stemming from the 1990’s which evidences this) for homes built with cheap Chinese materials,* and student loans for an education that gets you a door slammed in the face, but as far as the system is concerned you are not worthy to be treated equitably. I will provide an altered quote (my alteration in yellow) from John Howard Griffin’s book again:

 We’ll do business with you people. We’ll sure as hell screw your people over in nearly every facet of your life so you will not be able to achieve the American dream. Other than that, you’re just completely off the record as far as we’re concerned.

I could care less if someone called me bitter, walk a mile in someone else’s shoes before you spew names. Though a great sense of pride existed when teaching a Black man, woman, child how to read, and finally gaining access to institutions of learning, a shadow system was prepared to knocked down any progress that minorities built. It’s a disgrace.

*most new homes were built with these construction materials, though my primary point was regarding criminal lending practices.

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5 Comments »

  1. Nando Said:

    Life’s Mockery, I love your perspective on this shameful industry. I have been happy to have you on my blogroll since you started this site. I hear the same old tired garbage, i.e. “The government hires too many minorities.” I guess it is easier for these racists to do this, than it is for them to look at WHY black and brown people turn to the government for employment.

    Many minorities simply cannot find gainful employment in the private sector. Those who do manage to do so, are often the first to be fired. People can be rational – and when groups and individuals see that their effort is not being rewarded in one area – i.e. the private sector – they tend to look for work in more hospitable areas.

    • A Law School Victim Said:

      Waving truth serum, it’s times like this I appreciiate the internet, expose the country to the world. Years ago when U.S. balked at China for human rights violations a satorialist published a political cartoon with the earth and on the map of America a squashed black man on the ground with ‘uncle sam’ sitting on his back. I’d like to think it represented Black men, women and other minorities!

  2. JL Said:

    The funniest part is how you’ll have these racists point to the government and claim that minorities get preferential hiring, and that whites are discriminated against in the government. Outside of the fact that this is just total bullshit, maybe the reason the government has minorities in the first place is that minorities can’t get a job in the private sector, so they are forced to seek out employment with the government at far greater levels.

    So the racists see some minorities, and they immediately get angry and insist this is the result of discrimination against whites, refusing, as usual, to admit that the private sector and other situations cause mass discrimination against minorities.

    I personally have completely given up on the US ever having racial equality. It’s just a total joke. If you’re a minority, you must become an accountant, engineer or doctor. Those are your choices. Don’t dare expect to get a fair chance at anything else.

  3. Knut Said:

    Great post, Life’s Mockery. I’ve added you to my blog list at http://firsttiertoilet.blogspot.com/

    • A Law School Victim Said:

      Thank you, it’s just so frustrating when your family doesn’t get it and others don’t care to get it, and you hear amongst the evidence: “You have a law degree?” “You must make good money”…and I want say and you must be the gingerbread man because you’re in CandyLand..


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