Posts Tagged ‘attorney’

2013: More Rejection Letters

Select Rejection Letters 2013–Need I say more?
06/03/2013: Dear [     ]
We would like to thank you for applying to the above vacancy.

After a careful review of the background and qualifications of all candidates, we regret to inform you that you have not been selected for the shortlist.  Although you were not short-listed for this position, you may want to continue to review the opportunities in myJobWorld (http://myjobworld).  

We would like to take this opportunity to wish you continued success in the future and to thank you for your interest in this position.  
Kind regards,
Human Resources Services
The World Bank Group

NOTE: THIS MESSAGE IS SYSTEM GENERATED – YOU CANNOT REPLY TO THIS MESSAGE.

05/14/2013: Thank you for your interest in the International Relations faculty position
at UC Berkeley. This search was highly competitive, and unfortunately your application is no longer under consideration. We appreciate the time and energy invested in your application, and encourage you to apply for positions listed in the future. 

We wish you every personal and professional success with your job search.

Sincerely,
Kathleen Spaw
Academic Personnel Analyst

Re: Position 1758 – UC Berkeley International Relations Faculty Position

05/14/2013:

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY    
USCIS HR OPERATIONS CENTER    
70 KIMBALL AVENUE
SOUTH BURLINGTON VT  05403    

 Dear [           ]    

   This refers to the application you recently submitted to this office for the position below:    

Position Title: Entry Level Attorney    
Pay Plan:       GS   
Series/Grade: 0905-12    
Vacancy ID:      826700    
Announcement Number:      CIS-826700-COU    

Hiring Office: US Citizenship and Immigration Services    

Results regarding your recent referral to the Hiring Official are as follows:    

Referral Type:      Non-Traditional  
Appointment Type: Excepted Service Permanent    
Specialty / Grade:      0905 – 12    
Promotion Potential:      15    
Locations: Location Negotiable After Selection    

Thank you for applying for this position.  Your application has been considered.  However, another applicant was selected.  We appreciate your interest in employment with our agency.    
Audit Code:    NS    
Code Definition:    Not Selected    
Code Explanation:    

The selecting office has indicated that you were not selected for the position.    

Thank you for your interest in Federal employment.  You are encouraged to visit http://www.usajobs.gov to view additional Federal employment opportunities and information.    

PLEASE DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS EMAIL MESSAGE.  IT IS AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED.    

For additional information, please refer to the vacancy announcement for this position.    

05/03/2013
Recently we received your resume/application for the Humanities/Philosophy, Undergraduate School – Adjunct Faculty (Req# 8644) position at UMUC. Unfortunately, the University has decided that the position will not be recruited at this time. Please visit our career page where you can explore other opportunities that may be of interest http://www.umuc.edu/employment .

Thank you for your time and interest in UMUC. 
Sincerely, 
Talent Acquisition
Office of Human Resources

04/29/2013:
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY    
USCIS HR OPERATIONS CENTER    
70 KIMBALL AVENUE
SOUTH BURLINGTON VT  05403    

Dear [         ]
This refers to the application you recently submitted to this office for the position below:    

   Position Title: Entry Level Attorney    
   Pay Plan:  GS    
   Series/Grade: 0905-11    
   Vacancy ID:      826700    
   Announcement Number: CIS-826700-COU    

   Hiring Office: US Citizenship and Immigration Services    

Results regarding your recent referral to the Hiring Official are as follows:    

   Referral Type: Non-Traditional  
   Appointment Type: Excepted 
     Service Permanent    
   Specialty / Grade:      0905 – 11    
   Promotion Potential:      15    
   Locations: Location Negotiable After Selection    

Thank you for applying for this position.  Your application has been considered.  However, another applicant was selected.  We appreciate your interest in employment with our agency.    

   Audit Code:   NS    
   Code Definition:   Not Selected  
   Code Explanation:    

The selecting office has indicated that you were not selected for the position.    

Thank you for your interest in Federal employment.  You are encouraged to visit http://www.usajobs.gov to view additional Federal employment opportunities and information.    

PLEASE DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS EMAIL MESSAGE.  IT IS AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED.    

For additional information, please refer to the vacancy announcement for this position.

04/26/2013:    
EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR US ATTYS    
DO NOT MAIL APPLICATIONS    
YOU MUST APPLY ONLINE
WASHINGTON DC  20530    

Dear [          ]

This refers to the application you recently submitted to this office for the position below:    

   Position Title: Assistant United 
    States Attorney    
   Vacancy ID:      844037    
   Series/Grade:    N/A    

The agency has cancelled  or postponed filling this vacancy.    

Thank you for your interest in Federal employment.  You are encouraged to visit http://www.usajobs.gov to view additional Federal employment opportunities and information.    

 PLEASE DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS EMAIL MESSAGE.  IT IS AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED.    

For additional information, please refer to the vacancy announcement for this position.

04/15/2013:
[AP Search] JPF00011 J.D./LL.M./J.S.D. Program Tenured Faculty Search

Dear Applicant,
The Search Committee has concluded their review of applicants for the J.D./L.L.M/J.S.D. Program faculty position at Berkeley Law. There were a number of candidates applying for the position, and after much consideration, we regret to inform you that your application is no longer under consideration. 

We appreciate your patience during this long review process and thank you for your interest.

– Berkeley Law, Academic Positions    

04/06/2013: 
Hello [            ]
Thank you for taking the time to apply with us. We are unable to offer you a position at this time, but we do appreciate your interest in Target.

Target (YOU READ CORRECTLY-T-A-R-G-E-T)

For years trying these tactics have not and still do not work:  Informational interviewing with former professors, colleagues, referrals and attorneys I met at conferences didn’t help, going to different cities and knocking door to door to speak with legal secretaries and receptionists, parking lots of different businesses, and handing out one’s resume provided no leads though I get “You have all this” and “you seem great”, discussing the issue with volunteers at non-profits only to be provided the “you are doing everything right” or “that’s a shame,” registering at different state employment agencies though providing free services and undergoing verbal abuse and contempt on a daily basis by civil (oxymoron) workers who find out how educated you are leads to them not wanting them to help you or to see you succeed as they complain about how they did not “get” a chance to go to university and it doesn’t matter because these places focus on retail, IT or blue collar jobs that have no intetest in you; professional outreach workshops and networking provided few leads all the while continuously applying to jobs blind via online and postal mail; including those advertised at federal agencies, which provided no compensation at the federal Assistant Attorneys Office to only be told you are eligible; qualified; ranked among the best qualified and have the credentials and more but [herein lies the secret-you’re not white; you’re not male; you’re not IVY League; you don’t have connections; how would it look for us politically–in other words, for whichever reasons, we do not want YOUR kind here]

Don’t take a gamble with your future, especially if you’re a minority. Sallie Mae doesn’t care how hard you try, they will devour you.

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HBO: Underemployed Attorneys Get Taken Advantage Of

The other day I was perusing through the channels and stumbled upin a documentary on HBO about public defenders.

The film focused on attorneys from particular areas in the State of Georgia. Although the documentary followed them through trials; it also took aim at what working for state and local government does to them.

One female attorney said that she gets countless cases and low pay and that “you mean after all Ive done, after paying all my bills all I have is $20  (that’s right twenty dollars) left in my account?” 

“I have six figure student debt.”

“This is what you think of us?” She went on to discuss how a client was plotting her murder in the courtroom just in case the verdict isn’t what the defendant wants. Some other clients in jail warned her and a clip showed her crying and stating how she always visited the jail and was supportive of the defendant even if she wasn’t going to specifically discuss his case but he would call because no family or friends of his would see him.

She apparently cared about her job and work product while her employer saw her as a tool and cog in the hamster wheel with no pay.

The film goes on to a support group for public defenders. What disgusted me was a senior Public Defender tries to convince overworked, burnt out, under-paid over the head indebted aspiring attorneys to stick with it. He had the gall to try to compare what they do to the civil rights movement which he was clearly reaching because many of the attorneys were people of color.

It would have been more accurate to refer to the US Constitution. The civil rights was about human rights and discrimination based solely or primarily on skin color and ethnicity.

Towards the end they get treated to a special lunch in Washington, DC with Congressman Ray Lewis. 
Dear reader,  one now must ask him or herself whether the mental, physical and financial toll worth being an attorney, let alone an underpaid public defender while your future has been or will be cast on a wayward slope—accelerating downhill?

Do not go to law school. It simply is not worth it!

$10,000 First Year Associate Salary-Boston

No,this is not a joke. The article begins with:

Say No to Law School
Protect Your Sanity and Your
Financial Future

By now, most people know a law degree hardly guarantees law school graduates will snag a good job, let alone a high-paying BigLaw position.

But it may be even tougher than you think to get a high-paying legal job just out of law school. Hiring law firms, if you thought you were low-balling new grads, think again. (Boston Business Journal 06/01/2012): Legal job market hits new low: BC Law lists job below minimum wage 

Yahoo’s version: (06/01/2012)  Attention Lawyers: Get Your … $10,000 a Year Salary: 

The beginning of the article states: Attention college students applying to law school: put down the LSAT prep book. You might want to consider another line of work.

How can this be legal, it reminds me of how waitresses are paid poorly on an hourly basis then make most of their money on commission, maybe this is the same scheme. For shame, BELOW MINIMUM WAGE. Sallie Mae, SLM, Access, Nelnet does not care: All they say is _________ , you better have my money with a financial, back-handed slap known as late charges, additional finance charges, interests and other ‘costs.’

This has been going on for decades. Mainstream media is just late to the party; I would dare say ‘fashionably late.’ The kind of oh I was going to get there, so when I (mainstream media) arrive I appear to expose this dying legal market.

Law Professor and Former Dean Writes Book Exposing the Law School Scam

This article The Bad News Law Schools – NYTimes.com (2/20/2012) describes what a former law school dean but still law professor has to say regarding law schools failings and the American Bar Association’s complicity in the legal industry crisis:

In fact, that news was itself not so new. Uneasiness about the state of legal education has been around for some time, but in the wake of the financial meltdown of 2008, uneasiness ripened into a conviction that something was terribly wrong as law school applications declined, thousands of lawyers lost their jobs, employers complained that law school graduates had not been trained to practice law, and law school graduates complained that they had been led into debt by false promises of employment and high salaries. And while all this was happening, law schools continued to raise tuition, take in more and more students, and construct elaborate new facilities.

Well, I think this sums it up.

Even Spain’s Lawyers Can’t Find Jobs

Ok, so we heard about Britain and America and the oversaturation of the legal industry. I’ve even read about American law firms merging  with British ones resulting in the inevitable loss of jobs. India, well between outsourcing contract work and their oversaturation…oh and the Nigerian “lawyer’ who migrates to New York after taking a one year LLM and presto change-o-becomes a lawyer. But Spain? Ok the article is mostly about Spain’s poor economy and unemployment in general but of course, once again one cannot report about a country’s recession without mentioning “the unemployed lawyer”; this may become a new clinical diagnosis under DSMR-VI:

Many Spaniards lucky enough to have jobs these days are underemployed — law graduates working in restaurants, for example.

Here’s the article in full: Spain workers lose bridge holidays in debt crisis austerity move (01/22/2012)

So much for finding a job abroad. In the past year the media has discussed the problem with Greece and Italy. The European Union doesn’t want to bailout Greece until Greece shows it has a plan to get its country in order. The IMF says Italy isn’t doing so bad but is hesitant to loan its government money because its economy is not in the best of shape. So I’m sure we’ll see more about how their economies are affecting the legal industry there as well.

Breaking News (02/03/2012): Law grads go to Court for Bankruptcy Protection

See MSNBC article posted today: Law Grads Go to Court for Bankruptcy Protection. You can tell she was a recent graduate most people

All Rights Reserved

know that Sallie Mae lobbied Congress in the 1990s to stop allowing student loans from being discharged in bankruptcy. They have the whole legal industry–in their hands…♫ Because Sallie Mae would suffer undue hardship if student loans were discharged. It’s a tax write-off, they won’t lose anything. An indebted, unemployed, graduate, well you being unable to feed yourself, just does not fit within the purview of being important to the federal courts or financial institution. Good day…

My favorite line: “If you did not go to a top 40 law school and finished in the top 25 percent of your class, you’re not going to get one of those jobs,” said Jordan Abshire, principal of attorney recruiting agency Lateral Link. Abshire said that since 2008, he has seen more attorneys with a few years of experience filing for bankruptcy, often carrying a new home mortgage on top of their student loans.

Despite what CNN says the economy is not getting better, especially for law graduates. Another warning to the would be 0L, basically for you to earn enough money to live decently AND be able to pay back your student loans you have to go to a top school. I’m not sure why they said top 40, it’s really Top 10 and even those people are doing contract work. Further buried in the article:

The debt load on students is made worse by the shrinking legal job market. Since January 1, 2008, major law firms have laid off about 5,900 attorneys, according to the Lay-Off tracker at lawshucks.com, a blog that tracks law firm hiring. That is about 5 percent of all attorneys at the 250 largest law firms, according to the National Jaw Journal. (The U.S. Department of Labor does not collect job data on attorneys specifically.)

The truth shall set you free, if you are an 0L it will prevent you from economic slavery.

Don’t Go to Law School if You Want a Living Wage

All Rights Reserved

Should have been the title of the following news column, but I guess the current one will have to do:

  January 21, 2011:

Don’t go to law school if you want to make money | Susan Estrich | Columnists | Washington Examiner

At this point, it seems like bloggers, commenters and now even law professors who are exposing the game are becoming redundant. But with millions of futures at stake and an industry that has changed to the point of likely never reverting back to the traditional ways of living wage, true prestige and intellectual competition, we cannot say it enough. Do not go to law school:

In recent years, an increasing number of law students have not gotten jobs like those, because most large firms (who are the ones paying $160,000 to start) have cut back significantly on new hiring. The idea that you can just walk out of law school and into a six-figure job is, for many students at most schools, a painful fantasy.

There’s an enormous amount of Wall Street-style accounting that goes into the reports on employment that law schools submit to the increasingly powerful organizations that rank them. So when you look at the numbers, you might think that almost everyone who goes to a half-decent law school is finding a great job after graduation. Oh my does she dare suggests that big money and corporate finance is used to ‘enhance’ of law school statistics and ability to graduate top notch law students? Perish the thought [o.k. that was some real sarcasm]

My first job out of law school paid $13,909. Granted, it was a long time ago. But even then, it was substantially less than what my classmates were making in private practice and barely enough to cover my rent, food, gas and, of course, those student loans.

But so what? I didn’t go to law school to make money. If that were my goal, I would’ve gone to business school, got a job in investment banking and yearned for one of those eight-figure Goldman partnerships.

I went to law school because I believed in the power of law to change people’s lives for the better. And I have never been happier, professionally speaking, than when I was making almost no money but believed that what I was doing mattered.

If the primary reason you’re applying to law school is because you want one of those $160,000 jobs, don’t . Forget it. Like medicine, law used to be a sure-shot to making a very, very good income.

Not anymore. The students who apply to med school know that there is no pot of gold waiting.

There are many better and easier ways to make money. Kids go to medical school today because they want to be doctors, not because they want to be rich. The same rule should apply to law school.

Law school almost certainly is a losing game if what you care most about is money. In my book, that’s probably a good thing. I understand to mean that if one’s primary goal was to seek justice and help others, one is less likely to be corrupted in their judgment, political leaning and more dedicated as a zealous advocate. The question is for those people who thought like that, why should they not be able to do an excellent job in their field helping others WHILE earning a decent wage. It appears that she has assumed that the current economy is weeding out the shysters and get-rich scheme and big corporate lawyers. I would caution that if anything, desperation for money could just breed more of what she surmises the industry was getting rid of.

Many of my former students started out in those high-paying jobs and now feel trapped and frustrated. Many who didn’t have that option have, through necessity, found careers they enjoy much more.

At a certain point in life, the escalators just stop running. When they do, you have to fend for yourself — decide what you care about, what matters to you, what tradeoffs you are and are not willing to make. The problem is that many students weren’t debriefed about what those tradeoffs were and were given misrepresentations of what the payoff would likely be. I agree that you do have to “decide what you care about’ a decent living wage, quality of life, time for family to make new friends rank high. Going to law school greatly interferes with it though.

That’s what being an adult is about. There are no guarantees.

We all learn that sooner or later. And learning it in law school does not strike me as a losing game at all. Says the woman with a decent paying job. Just say ‘no.’

Cornell Journal of Law & Public Policy: Predatory Student Loan Lenders, Middle Class Hope for Upward Mobility, the Legal Industry and the Inevitable Bubble

As some potential law students continue to await LSAT scores, law school admissions or are wondering whether or not going to law school will give them that one chance at a better life, it would benefit you to read the following:

Being led to the slaughter

A law journal article: 20 Cornell Journal of Law & Public Policy 67 (2010)
Options for Student Loan Borrowers: A Derivatives-Based Proposal to Protect Students and Control Debt Fueled Inflation in the Higher Education Market, Michael C. Macchiarola; Arun Abraham

O.k. so this article is 72 pages, obviously I won’t delve into the entire piece but I am placing some introductory quotes in which the author is direct with failing legal industry and how the student loan industry are basically predators. He specifically discusses law schools and new lawyers are a bad investment. the author is a ‘distinguished lecturer.’ The author is a law professor and is honest enough to basically state that going to law school isn’t worth it. Do you 0Ls get it? one of your potential professors is telling you that LAW SCHOOL IS A BAD INVESTMENT!

Here are the Table of Contents for a very brief overview:
INTRODUCTION                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    I. THE RUNAWAY COSTS OF AMERICAN LEGAL EDUCATION
By the Numbers
The Causes: A Combustible Mix of Accreditation,Rankings, Peculiar Incentives and Federal Encouragement
A Brief History of the Law School and Its Accreditation
The Rankings Game
The Peculiar Incentives of the Law School Faculty
The Federal Government and the Student Loan Market
The Scope of Government Involvement
Crisis in the Market and the Emergence of SAFRA
Income-Based Repayment and More of the Same
“For-Profit” Schools and a Way Forward

THE DISAPPOINTING REVENUE PICTURE FOR LAW SCHOOL GRADUATES
INFORMATION ASYMMETRIES AND ENTERPRISE LIABILITY
Informational Asymmetries Abound
Applying Lessons from Enterprise Liability Theory

Now for some introductory quotes:
Runaway tuitions and the burdensome student debt required for most Americans to obtain a post-secondary degree are under scrutiny like never before.4 Evidence is beginning to mount that, for too many students, debt-financed education represents a stifling encumbrance instead of the great investment that society’s collective commonsense has long advanced.5 Such a finding is unsurprising in light of the fact that, for too long, the value of education has been reflexively embraced without adequate examination of its cost. (p. 69-70)

As most bloggers have been stating, the cost is not worth the proposed benefit with all of the practical variables: economy, shrinking industry, inflation, lower salaries, loan payments and their capitalized interest as well as the time and psychological warfare this field demands.

The cost of attending law school, for example, has increased at two to three times the rate of inflation over the last three decades.11 The promise of accessible loans has made loan eligible middle- and lower-income students an easy mark for unabashed, aggressive student-loan marketing.12 “The end result,” in fact, “has been an unprecedented, debt-fueled wealth transfer from students of modest means to the increasingly prosperous higher education industry and opportunistic student loan lenders.” (p. 71-72)

Now deemed “McLaw” this along with LPOs and general outsourcing has set the middle class population in a cycle of perpetual financial slavery. Upward mobility is not founded in usurious personal debt. Do not think of the titles. Do not think of prestige. Think of your life and happiness and with any common sense you will decide not to attend law school.

US News & World Reports: (Law School) Know What You’re Getting Into

US News & World Reports
Ann Levine
November 22, 2010

I am proud to be a lawyer and I am proud to help other people reach their dream of becoming a lawyer. [sounds desparate to sell the profession]. However, there have been numerous stories recently that may discourage you from applying to law school. There are negative and disgruntled law students and attorneys warning you about the evils of law schools, of the profession, and of anyone remotely related to it. My goal is to make sure you don’t join that disgruntled bunch. [Which can simply be prevented by not attending law school]

So, if you decide to go to law school, you need to feel that the benefits outweigh the sacrifices and potential drawbacks that many of the naysayers routinely harp on. Go into it with your eyes wide open, ready to work hard, ready to make your way and create your own career. [Sounds like a tort in the beginning you are proceeding into a known danger and that it’s forseeable that you will have damages]. You won’t expect anyone to hand you a six figure job at graduation.

[This is such a misleading characterization, that most attorneys EXPECT six figures. No most attorneys expect after committing and investing time, money, effort and basically their life into achieving admittance into a noble profession that one can obtain a job in which one can have DECENT housing, food and transportation. The only graduates who really expect six figures upon graduation are those set for the patent bar, trust fund babies, IVY League graduates with connections.]

You will go into this with an understanding of the realities of the profession. You will know that success does not happen overnight, that your dream job isn’t the first job out of law school, but the one you hold ten years down the road. [false misrepresentation, how in the world can such a writer state this with a ‘straight face’ without submitting statistics or even state based on people he or she knows. It appears the author writes in theory or the same rhetoric that continues to be told to unsuspecting 0Ls.]
There is no fast track to success in law school or in anything else in life. The key is to make the best decisions you can about your future with the information you currently have at your disposal.

I want you to really consider whether to go to law school, and I want to share the questions you should be asking before you go. Plus, I want to make sure you are equipped to make good decisions about where to attend.

Let’s start here: Reasons NOT to Go to Law School:

1. Money (How much does law school cost and how can I pay for it?)

2. Time (three years full-time, 4 years part-time)

3. Bad career outlook in current economic environment

4. It’s difficult

5. It’s competitive

6. There are too many lawyers

It appears that 1, 3, 5, 6 are all related to NOT being able to get a job or make decent money with a law degree. Decent refers to enough money to sustain you and your family (whatever that may be) with food, gas, heat, electricity, housing and transportation. Four out of the six reality checks are stating that you cannot live a normal life with a law degree. So those of you who are already making $50,000-$75,000 without a law degree; you are in a much better position than most licensed American attorneys. So, does it make ANY sense to encumber your life with unnecessary debt to be in a profession with superficial professionalism, mentally disabled persons who many have broken down after realizing the reality of what going to law school has done to them, all while struggling to meet your monthly financial obligations and reaching for straws to keep a facade of upward mobility. Reason with yourself and don’t ignore the signs.

Points 2 and 4 are related to losing valuable years of your life to spend hours, days, weeks studying to impress law professors who already made their decisions of who each student is, where they will fall in the mandatory curve within the first week of classes, all the while subjecting students to the Socratic method with the intent of satisfying a power-trip. Now all professors are like this but most are. Your first year you do not select your law professors and many have tenure, so good luck in being treated fairly while learning about the law–ironic isn’t it?

Now, the Reasons TO Attend Law School:

1. Learning how to think

2. Profession you can always rely upon/Job security

3. Helping others/contributing to the community

4. Being important and respected

5. Financial security, prosperity

Points 2 and 5 do not make any sense in light of the previous set of points. Although most professions and both the private and public sector is suffering due to the current economy, the legal profession has forever changed. There is no such thing as financial security in general when there is a permanent oversaturation of law graduates and attorneys. Due to this saturation how can point 4 be valid? Value is based on quality and rarity. Many media outlets have exposed how unprepared most law graduates are and have been over the past few decades. When lawyers are a dime a dozen, how are you important? Though theoretically an attorney is to advocate, be a defender of the Constitution, etc, most attorneys are either focused on keeping their financial security which inevitably compromises the value of the services and as a result the profession. Additionally, when there is not a demand for a product or service, the price steadily decreases (oversaturation).

You need to do your research about each one of these pros and cons. How much can you expect to make in the area of law you plan on pursuing? What would your student loan payment be? Your rent? Your car payment? Etc.

So, how can you research this? Talk to lawyers in big firms, lawyers who work for the public defender, lawyers who work in a firm with only two or three attorneys, or insurance defense attorneys. Ask them how much they made in their first five years of practice and how much they made after ten years. Ask them what they really do all day. Ask them to describe a typical case they are working on. [A simple approach is to read these blogs. The following two questions are good suggestions though:]

Ask them what time they get to the office everyday and what time they leave. Ask them if they like their jobs.
Ask them where they went to law school. Did they take a scholarship to a lower ranked school? Why or why not?

Do top law schools open some doors? Do you want to clerk for the Supreme Court? Be a law professor? I suggest you look up people who have jobs you would like to have one day and see where they went to law school.

It’s essential you have a firm grasp on what the profession entails before you commit. Comparing and contrasting the answers to these questions with your expectations is key to helping you make your decision.

If you’ve gone through this thought process and you still decide to attend law school, you will know what you are getting yourself into. You will be in a position to make good decisions about your future. And then you’ll be ready to hear this podcast: How to Get Hired as a Rookie Attorney.

In other words you will definitely be “proceeding into a known danger.”

Poor Journalism: Not Reflecting the True Face of the Legal Industry

Please let me know how one company hiring four recent law graduates is a sign of good news when TENS of THOUSANDS of recent and older lawyers are unemployed, underemployed, not working in the legal field at all? How is this great news, the number of people hired you can count on one hand and still have room. This appears to be moreso a press release for Hewlett-Packard than an actual article. The piece discusses hiring the recent law graduates as in-house attorneys making nearly what they would as first year associates at BigLaw but actually gaining practical legal skills. “The new lawyers will learn substantive law, litigation skills and business acumen, HP leaders say. But most important, they’ll learn those things from the client’s point of view.”

 

O.k., it’s great that a company seized an opportunity to make attorneys work for the money while benefitting the corporation, but really how does hiring 4 graduates give hope to the masses of Sallie Mae indebted, near homeless, caught in the sweeping tide of one of the worst recessions in this country? “We saw an opportunity when the recession hit,” said Deputy General Counsel Gabriel Buigas, who helped develop the program. “We could actually go and recruit people on an equal footing with a law firm and we could probably do a better job internally in training them.”                  

“He likens HP’s training program to the apprenticeships recently created by big firms like Howrey, Orrick, Drinker Biddle & Reath and others.”

Press release for Hewlett-Packard and free advertisement for the three firms mentioned in my previous post concerning the apprenticeship model: https://lifesmockery.wordpress.com/2010/06/15/an-article-and-the-idea-of-law-practice-reform/]

Here’s the actual article: Law.com – HP Decides to Hire, Train Fresh Law School Graduates, June 21, 2010. Notice in both articles there’s doubt whether the apprenticeship model for newly minted lawyers will be the new trend among companies and firms. Thus, it will not, as now, benefit the majority of attorneys in the future.

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