Posts Tagged ‘bar exam’

New York Law School: Bad GPA? How about Another Semester on the House.

Education Loan Payments Once You Graduate

 Since law school administrators know that their current form of providing a legal education is inadequate to prepare graduating law students for the real world of law practice and to pass the bar exam, they found a new way to fudge their numbers. Since more mainstream media and law school scam blogs have brought attention for reform with law school employment statistics and student debt, one law school is offering some students one more semester to not deal with the hovering reality that will crash upon them once they graduate. The article mentions it focused on those “at risk” upon graduation, would one dare say you knew they were “at risk” when you offered them admission/enrolled them into your law program. Overexpanding your annual enrollment class to keep whatever financial aid from the federal government into you ‘institution of higher education?’ Read the following article of what New York Law School is now planning to do in order to skew the numbers:

Bad GPA? How about Another Semester on the House (02/06/2012)

One free semester after a full 3-year matriculation will likely change nothing. Whatever it takes to keep the numbers right, future student loan debt rolling into the schools and crashing on the law graduate.

Advertisements

The Wall Street Journal: Lawyers Settle…for Temp Jobs

Lawyers Settle…for Temp Jobs

June 15, 2011 By VANESSA O’CONNELL

When he decided to become a lawyer, Jose Aponte followed a familiar path: He took the LSAT, spent more than $100,000 on law school, took a grueling bar exam and paid for continuing education.

But the work the 37-year-old New York lawyer, a graduate of American University’s Washington College of Law, is getting is a far cry from the stable, lucrative type he originally envisioned.

The grunt work in corporate litigation is being farmed out to contract attorneys. More and more law school graduates, steeped in student-loan debt, are settling for this unsteady, monotonous work for surprisingly low pay. WSJ’s Vanessa O’Connell and Jason Bellini report.

Mr. Aponte is part of a growing field of itinerant “contract” attorneys who move from job to job, getting paid by the hour, largely to review documents for law firms and corporate clients. These short-term jobs, which can pay as little as $15 an hour, have increasingly become a fixture in the $100 billion global corporate legal industry as law firms and clients seek to lower their costs.

This new “third tier” of the legal world illustrates the commoditization of the legal profession, which once offered most new entrants access to prestige and power, as well as a professional lifestyle. It also shows how post-recession belt-tightening is permanently altering some professions….

Please tell me why is this article JUST NOW being published. It’s so ‘johnny come lately” that it’s journalistic satire. Lawyers haven’t settle into contract work–they have been pushed into contract work by TTT and TTTT schools, false statistics, an economic bubble, lost jobs and oversaturation in the legal industry and let’s not forget outsourcing. The title alone makes it appear that an attorney is CHOOSING to be a temp lawyer when the reality is that many do it because they I don’t know would like to eat the next day. Any time an economy have partners and associates losing their jobs in the private sector and firms merger with others in Europe to decrease costs and relying on LPOs as their new business model the over-the-top educated ones in debt will suffer.

Interesting how the author uses the word “commoditization” you know a sophisticated manner of referring to the legal industry as McLaw or its attorneys ummm “slaves” or “working poor.”

The title is a mockery to those who have worked hard and constantly applied for jobs in their field and level of experience. Then again, maybe lawyers have settled…settled into knowing that their industry and their lives as they believe it would be will never exist or be the same again. It’s a conventional and practical way of thinking for many. To avoid disappointment, become accustomed to depression and being in debt and knowing that your life has been financially ruined though you will be held to a higher standard than any lay person. At a brink where we should be screaming at the top of our lungs are voices have turned to a faint shriek because no one cares. It’s a joke. The only sanity you can really hold on to is regardless of your professors they may have sabatoged you (not all just most), the economy and the corporate greed, you did your best but it’s game that you have likely already lost; but most people do not make a conscious choice to lose. They just didn’t know the game was rigged from the beginning.

The More Things Change…: ‘Northwestern to Help Foreign Students Take NY Bar Exam so NY Can Have More Unemployed Lawyers’

 

…the more they stay the same. While perusing the net, I encountered this short stint:

Northwestern to Help Foreign Students Take NY Bar Exam so NY Can Have More Unemployed Lawyers

By On the Net, on March 16th, 2010; http://www.keytlaw.com/blog/2010/03/ny-lawyers/

 The United States economy is down.  Law schools are producing more law school graduates than available new legal jobs.  Lawyers like most other segments of the American business world are being laid off and experiencing declining revenue.  One backward thinking school has a novel solution to the “we have too many lawyers” problem – produce more lawyers!  Northwestern University School of Law is teaming with the College of Law in England to create a program for the College of Law students to get a masters degree from Northwestern University, which would then make the graduates eligible to take the New York bar exam.  After 22 weeks of study, the College of Law grads will get a J.D. from Northwestern, something that takes traditional Northwestern students three academic years to obtain.  This is more proof that higher education is always about the money at the expense of the students.

Judith W. Wegner, the Burton Craige Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina School wrote an article called “More Complicated than We Think: A Response to Rethinking Legal Education in Hard Times: The Recession, Practical Legal Education and the New Job Market.”  The article contains these statements:

“For example, the National Law Journal’s most recent survey of the “NLJ 250” large firms concluded that 13.3 percent of large firm attorneys working in New York City lost their jobs this year [2009]“

“The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics recently reported that, when seasonally adjusted, the number of jobs in legal services fell from 1,157,700 in November 2008 to a projected 1,115,900 for November 2009 (a decline of 9.6 percent over the prior year”

“The American Bar Association reports that for students graduating in 2008, the average debt load for those attending private schools was $91,506, while those attending public law schools on average accumulated $59,324 in debt.”

See “The Year in Law Firm Layoffs – 2009,” which said “2009 will go down as the worst year ever for law-firm layoffs. More people were laid off by more firms than had been reported for all previous years combined.”  See also Above the Law’sThe College of Law — London, Makes Move in U.S. Market.”

 O.k. you commenters on the law scam busting websites. You can have a field day with this one. You qualify to take the bar in 6 months after a “program” at Northwestern Law. This is the degradation of the legal field. Once again, Americans are held to the highest standards while foreigners enter this country with no debt, usually a hatred for Americans but given the blessing to enter the playing field of the legal industry with less repurcussions.