Posts Tagged ‘law’

Opinion: Contract Work & ‘Minorities’

The following simply needs to be said and the reader can take this with a grain of salt:

Most contract attorneys’ general self esteem is so low due to a feeling of powerless or incompetence that they focus on attackng (false accusations, name calling, other manners of one sided anatgonism) one another (who are usually complete strangers) for one more day or even a few hours more of hours of work to increase their unpredictable paychecks. This phenomenon is most pervasive among Black attorneys who know that they have been already been shut out of the mainstream workforce and solidifies mainstream America’s perception that most possess the inability to be professional, complete assignments that they are PAID to do, to speak in a normal tone in which they do not sound like childish bullies, nor do most embrace diversity.  It appears to be simple but these are insurmountable tasks for ghetto blacks who attain a JD and nothing else. No prepared goals or self development or expansion of their views including the world around them, resulting in tunnel vision and narrowminded mindset.  As a result the ‘gangsta’ and ‘b****y’ troublemaking attitudes exacerbates the problems that minorities have in this shrinking field. Of course not all Blacks in law or even legal contract work are like this. But most who are one will notice are contract attorneys, others who aren’t are unfortunately and oft-times swept up into the stereotype bin sourrounded by those with the ‘crabs in a barrel’ mentality. This is easily perceptible among Black women.  

With the given financial problems that law schools, law firms and law students and attorneys are facing, these inappropriate, narcicssitic and childish behaviors only make it easier to shut minorities who do not possess these characteristics out of the workforce regardless of ambition, talent or intelligence.

I do not dare assert that doing contract work will lead to a job–most attorneys who are not new law school graduates know this is false. The problem is that attorneys with deranged mentalities find joy in creating a hostile, disruptive work environment in an already degrading set of circumstances and I see it primarily among women. (Black, White and Asian) Perhaps this is why most people assume all contract attorneys are bipolar, schizophrenic or possess some other type of mental defect.

In other words, these types of people in the field make it harder for people of color who are generally normal and desire success and do not have plans to be in those types of environments for the long haul.

The only type of people who enjoy mischief and harming innocent strangers can simply be described as demonic. Another reason why no one cares what happens to attorneys.

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Too Many Lawyers Not Enough Jobs: New York Edition

The statistics cannot be ignored, slow economy, too many lawyers not enough jobs = Do Not Attend law school. We warned you and now more than ever main stream media is catching up. Because it’s so obvious and so overwhelming. Where before, say five or more years ago, one had an excuse, no knowledge of deceptive statistics, false encouragement of upward mobility, the higher education will make your life better. The Wall Street Journal is telling you there aren’t enough jobs for attorneys and they’re just referring to the NEWLY minted law graduates; not those who have been laid off or otherwise terminated, from the high ranking partnerships to the staff attorney who find that there is no resources awaiting them in the legal industry.So add that to the 9,000 new law school graduates in New York alone. Here you go:

New York Times Report Show Lawyer Surplus Law Jobs Shortage, Lawcrossing Finds 29,000 Attorney Jobs

Pasadena, CA — (SBWIRE) — 06/29/2011
The New York Times is reporting that the tough job market for new lawyers is partly a result of a lawyer glut in the law jobs market.

The article is based on data gathered and analyzed by Economic Modeling Specialists Inc. (EMSI), a consulting firm specializing in economic analysis and employment data. The figures gathered by EMSI in fact show that the law schools are graduating more JDs than the economy can absorb for the next few years.

EMSI has taken as its baseline the number of people passing the bar in every state and DC in 2009. The numbers were then put up against the number of estimated job openings for lawyers in those states for the period 2010-15. In every state except Wisconsin and Nebraska, plus DC, there was a lawyer surplus.

The biggest surplus was in New York. 9,787 people passed the bar in 2009 for an estimated 2,100 openings for the period 2010-15. Nationwide, there were only 26,239 job openings for lawyers, while 53,508 people passed the bar. California was in second page with almost 3,000 lawyers in surplus.

Even Nebraska and Wisconsin just have negligible surpluses of law jobs for lawyers. But even though attorney jobs for new lawyers are scare, they exist in most states. LawCrossing is a job aggregator site for all types of legal jobs. The site has been able to locate over 5,500 attorney jobs in New York alone. Nationwide it has located over 29,000 attorney jobs.

Another Field Looking to Exploit Desperate, New Law Graduates

All Rights Reserved

An interesting article, amidst the shrinking legal market, financial firms believe their business will increase by offering similar services to law firms: Look to law grads for recruits, June 24, 2010 

IFAs should look to law graduates as a source of new recruits, according to Sifa. Speaking on board PIMS last week, Sifa development director David Seager said there are few jobs at present for law graduates and financial services firms should look at recruiting them into the IFA profession. Wait, you want to get businesses to hire law graduates who took upon themselves $100,000+ in non-dischargeable debt to fill positions of financial advisors

He said: “There are a lot of people studying law but there are very few jobs. We always have this debate in financial services about where the new blood will come from. Firms should start looking at law graduates.” [emphasis mine] O.k., let’s clarify, yes many students study law, common law, theories, unrealistic hypotheticals which garner no practical legal skills. Unless that law graduate has an MBA or you’re willing to train them on finance, you may be making an investment in these law graduates with the same risk the law graduates made with attending law school. That one business law class will not help them “hit the ground running” at your company. 

Seager said it is estimated that 3,000 out of 8,900 law firms in England and Wales will go out of business by 2012 due to the rise of transactional legal services offerings from big companies such as Tesco. Wow, I can only imagine the number of solo practicioners and mid-size firms that the economy will devour in the United States, especially with top firms laying off staff and associates. 

He said the introduction of Tesco legal services will appeal to a number of consumers because they already have a client relationship with Tesco. He said that clients will be able to get the same transaction from Tesco for half the price offered by some law firms, so solicitors need to focus on building their client relationships to survive. I see, Tesco and other similar business firms would like to absorb the unemployed attorneys, increase their business production, increase their competition with law firms with the hopes of obliterating the legal industry. Makes sense. 

Seager said that IFAs can help solicitor firms to do this by moving away from a purely transactional business model. He said: “There is going to be huge consolidation in the legal sector and IFAs should be looking to make the most of that. I wouldn’t say consolidation, moreso an industry takeover. 

“IFAs are in a good position to partner up with solicitors and offer consultancy on how to change their business model so they retain more clients.”   Seager said that solicitors have 20 per cent client retention on average. 

People are either waiting for or trying to take advantage of the collapsing legal industry, but that’s the point—it is collapsing. Save yourself.

On a Lighter Note…: Television Images We See of Black Attorneys

.yes I had to put legalease in the caption

I was thinking about the images of the 1980s-present of black lawyers I saw on television. Of course we remember Clair Huxtable, the very witty-social host-mother-wife-attorney whom could be seen polishing the family silverware in the kitchen. I think for me that was the first time I saw an image of a black woman as a successful lawyer married to a doctor who both had deep respect for their cultural roots and family values.

Of course I remember Maxine Shaw from ‘Living Single’, Freddie when she was accepted to the prestigious yet fictious HBCU Hillman Law School, the prosecutor-District Attorney Carter (Courtney Vance) from Law & Order, Joan and William, the corporate associates on ‘Girlfriends’.

Unfortunately, these shows didn’t show the reality of many Black American attorneys who didn’t attend elite schools, weren’t a part of the black upper class (yes they do exist in America, read: Our Kind of People by Lawrence Otis Graham), nor part of the black or white connected clubs which I see is somewhat intertwined with the previous ideal.

As a matter of fact, the spin-off of ‘Girlfriends’ was based on Joan’s younger sister struggling through medical school while seeing a famous rookie football player, as well as in ‘A Different World’ the character Kim’s father is a policeman and she struggles working two jobs through undergrad and struggles through medical school. Why is law school so glamorized while television continues to show medical residents and doctors struggle to balance their lives with their hoped for career. Maybe because so many attorneys in reality are that stereotype: conniving, deceptive, trained to have a tough exterior where weakness is frowned upon. I guess in a way there aren’t enough strong attorneys with the courage to expose the inherent pitfalls in attending law school, because that would be weak, that would be an “admission” that you didn’t make it, well that’s just not being a lawyer!

With these pictorial depictions flashed in front of millions, who would be a poor or middle class prospective law student’s mentor to steer them to the right school or even guide them as to whether law is an appropriate field? How do these potential mentors access them? One way is through these blogs.

Savannah Morning News: Ruffin, first black chief state Court of Appeals judge, dies

Black History Month feature:  Unfortunately we are losing the memory of those who paved the way for others, but we get glimpses of their work, only when they die:
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Ruffin, first black chief state Court of Appeals judge, dies
http://savannahnow.com/latest-news/2010-02-01/ruffin-first-black-chief-state-court-appeals-judge-dies