Posts Tagged ‘no debt’

An Innovative Idea: High School and Higher Education

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In Georgia, colleges are paid to teach high-achieving high schoolers. [June 17, 2010: 

Ga. program lets high school students attend college full time  | ajc.com, Atlanta Journal Constitution]

 These minor academics must have and maintain rigorous grade point averages and are able to dual-matriculate between high school and college. The high school student does not pay tuition! The high school sends funds to the university that the student attends. So the high school students will go to college for the most part for free, graduate early,  have high grades and no student loans? What an idea! “The new program requires high school students to become full-time college students by taking at least 12 credit hours on campus, said Gary Mealer, a program specialist with the Georgia Department of Education.”

I wonder if this would’ve worked for undergraduate students. Earning undergraduate credits while matriculating at law school. Looking at the article’s model, the law school would still get paid, oh wait, law schools charge an exorbitant amount of money for law education and since there are rigorous criteria, likely the undergraduate institution would not be willing to shift funds to third and fourth tier law schools. So I guess law schools wouldn’t get paid. Never mind.

After reading the first portion of the article, this high school student had to mess up the hope the reader had for them: “”I know I want to go to law school, and this allows me to get an early start on my college education,” said Spencer Marion, 17. “High school just wasn’t interesting for me anymore. Why stay there when I had the chance to go to college?” Are you sure?, really, you guys are supposed to be the best and the brightest, I hope you find these blogs, most of your work will likely be for naught.

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The More Things Change…: ‘Northwestern to Help Foreign Students Take NY Bar Exam so NY Can Have More Unemployed Lawyers’

 

…the more they stay the same. While perusing the net, I encountered this short stint:

Northwestern to Help Foreign Students Take NY Bar Exam so NY Can Have More Unemployed Lawyers

By On the Net, on March 16th, 2010; http://www.keytlaw.com/blog/2010/03/ny-lawyers/

 The United States economy is down.  Law schools are producing more law school graduates than available new legal jobs.  Lawyers like most other segments of the American business world are being laid off and experiencing declining revenue.  One backward thinking school has a novel solution to the “we have too many lawyers” problem – produce more lawyers!  Northwestern University School of Law is teaming with the College of Law in England to create a program for the College of Law students to get a masters degree from Northwestern University, which would then make the graduates eligible to take the New York bar exam.  After 22 weeks of study, the College of Law grads will get a J.D. from Northwestern, something that takes traditional Northwestern students three academic years to obtain.  This is more proof that higher education is always about the money at the expense of the students.

Judith W. Wegner, the Burton Craige Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina School wrote an article called “More Complicated than We Think: A Response to Rethinking Legal Education in Hard Times: The Recession, Practical Legal Education and the New Job Market.”  The article contains these statements:

“For example, the National Law Journal’s most recent survey of the “NLJ 250” large firms concluded that 13.3 percent of large firm attorneys working in New York City lost their jobs this year [2009]“

“The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics recently reported that, when seasonally adjusted, the number of jobs in legal services fell from 1,157,700 in November 2008 to a projected 1,115,900 for November 2009 (a decline of 9.6 percent over the prior year”

“The American Bar Association reports that for students graduating in 2008, the average debt load for those attending private schools was $91,506, while those attending public law schools on average accumulated $59,324 in debt.”

See “The Year in Law Firm Layoffs – 2009,” which said “2009 will go down as the worst year ever for law-firm layoffs. More people were laid off by more firms than had been reported for all previous years combined.”  See also Above the Law’sThe College of Law — London, Makes Move in U.S. Market.”

 O.k. you commenters on the law scam busting websites. You can have a field day with this one. You qualify to take the bar in 6 months after a “program” at Northwestern Law. This is the degradation of the legal field. Once again, Americans are held to the highest standards while foreigners enter this country with no debt, usually a hatred for Americans but given the blessing to enter the playing field of the legal industry with less repurcussions.