Posts Tagged ‘old’

A Short Conversation at a Cafe on Legal Education: International Style

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O.k., first, why in this metro area you will hear conversations about lawyers or law school (I know it’s concentrated with law schools but must we talk about it?) Anyway, a couple of weeks ago I was in line at a Chipotle and heard one woman speaking to another about presumable a mutual friend. Mind you they looked like they were 45+ years and I heard “she’s an executive” of something and some company oh and she’s a lawyer too, but she doesn’t practice. Oh, I’m shocked.

Today, I found a quaint cafe and decided to satisfy my sweet tooth. The cashier happened to be from Korea and since it was slow business (I was the only one in there) I decided to talk about the economy briefly when asked oh so what’s your field? The cashier was still in college but was explaining the difference between going to law school in Korea versus America. First, she said, their undergraduate degree is the law degree, I initially misunderstood and stated “pre-law” and then I figured it was a system similar to the solicitor-barrister track after LLB in England. They have to apprentice and practice in order to qualify for the exam from what I understood. The cashier stated that after that level degree they take a test then choose to be a judge or lawyer. That’s it. The cashier stated that here it’s all about getting a license, that the cashier’s friends who have licenses that’s all it is because they don’t have jobs and they don’t practice law. Nail on the head.

Reading the cashier’s face, there was a look of frustration regarding the U.S. system, like you have to go to higher education for seven years, take the bar, clerk or work a certain number of years then these tiers of associate, senior associate, qualifiers for masters, judges, administrative judges, etc. The cashier changed majors after learning about the U.S. system and it didn’t take a blog to do it.

p.s.: I did ask about student loans and the cashier stated they have it but not like in the U.S. and they don’t have to pay for everything in their higher education, in some ways you don’t here due to scholarships and grants, but you will always pay when it comes to law school.