Posts Tagged ‘U.S. postal service’

Part II: The U.S. Post Office is Always Hiring (This is about the Census)

Down and out? Well, it’s not getting any better.  In a prior post I submitted the quote: : “After just two years as an associate at a small firm in the District, Williams was laid off in November 2008. She assumed she would land another job within four months. When that didn’t happen, her brother mentioned seeing an ad that the Census Bureau was hiring.” [The Washington Post Carol Morello, Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, March 8, 2010 [
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/03/07/AR2010030702886.html?hpid=topnews ]

Basically, everyone who’se overeducated and overqualified will be competing for a job that those who are less educated, more likely to stay longer and probably have little to no student loans will be applying for. Did you ever think that qualifying for a Census Bureau clerk position would become so competitive? Although I think it may be difficult (personal security) to be a census worker, but with a possible benefit of helping attorneys learn social and coping skills in dealing with others (something that’s not learned in law school); let’s face reality, it doesn’t take 2 to 3 degrees to fulfill the role. Look at this NPR article:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=125225460

Overeducated And Unemployed? Try The Census by Brian Naylor Check out NPR’s article

Ph.D. Turns Census Clerk  Herman Kopecek is a would-be college professor who has taught history, philosophy and business ethics. But with teaching jobs hard to find, Kopecek and his Ph.D. are now working for the census. His job title?

Clerk.

See there? The more degrees you have doesn’t equal higher employment, better lifestyle, better personal finances. And you guys still have the audacity to still apply to law school? What are you thinking (*smack to the left side of your head*).

For those you have been thinking of moving abroad, I suggest that you do your research and understand that you won’t be practicing law ‘there’ either. As many more are becoming aware, it is evident that e-discovery tools are the next step in streamlining discovery and reducing firms’ overhead. In England, the existence of too many lawyers is burdening the taxpayers (no mention of barristers or solicitors suffering for student loan debt though):

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1259926/Jack-Straw-says-Britain-lawyers.html

Britain has too many lawyers… says justice chief (and lawyer) Jack Straw

By Steve Doughty
So for those who actually been contemplating and qualify to practice law in England and likely the rest of Europe, well it may be wise to reconsider.

The U.S. Post Office is always hiring

Actually it’s not. During the past two years the Washington, D.C.; Virginia; Maryland areas postal services were affected by the recession. Local news stations touted the proposed shorter office hours as wells as reducing the number of days a postal worker delivers mail to 5 instead of 6 days. Wow, in my experience I have to wonder which is worse, waiting in a line at a bank for a teller to wait on you or waiting at the post office. I think it depends on the time of day and the teller, usually they’re both horrible. As of date, the U.S. postal service still delievers 6 days a week, but now they’re considering ‘reducing staff.’ Really? I guess having 2-3 tellers is too much especially when you service three suburban counties. So by now you have realized that the U.S. Postal Service isn’t hiring; but the U.S. Census is–allegedly.

I knew of an attorney who applied last year and was told that it was only the beginning of the application process. The Washington Post seems to promote being a census taker–at least it’s money. One cannot have an article about unemployed professionals without discussing the attorney who is looking for work:

The Washington Post Carol Morello, Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, March 8, 2010 [
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/03/07/AR2010030702886.html?hpid=topnews ]

“After just two years as an associate at a small firm in the District, Williams was laid off in November 2008. She assumed she would land another job within four months. When that didn’t happen, her brother mentioned seeing an ad that the Census Bureau was hiring.”

Wow, at least she was able to get some real legal experience–I’m assuming. And look at this article posted a few days ago, it’s as if attorney’s are the new gauge for unemployment rates among professionals!:

‘Those college degrees don’t seem to be worth very much now,’ Dayton Daily News, March 16, 2010, Carol Flowers [http://www.daytondailynews.com/opinion/those-college-degrees-dont-seem-to-be-worth-very-much-now-603118.html ]

“My son holds five associate degrees, a bachelor’s, a master’s and a law degree. He has passed the bar exam in three states and cannot get a nibble because he is in competition for jobs with unemployed lawyers who have 10 to 15 years of experience.” Ok, this mother has to be reading our blogs now, so maybe family members do understand, well I still think most don’t.  Maybe she was part of the PLUS loan programs and now her credit is being affected, who knows, but the college-law school promos are being exposed.

Now just imagine that you were an older attorney but in the same situation. Economists state this is a jobless economic recovery. What? So I am to conclude the only ones primarily benefitting from a financial upturn would be actual corporations.