Posts Tagged ‘law schools’

TIME Magazine Article: Just How Bad Off Are Law School Graduates?

I don’t think it is just the scam blogging I think the problem is so obvious that mainstream media has to address it:

TIME Magazine Article (03/11/2013): Just How Bad Off Are Law School Graduates?

The first thing I’ll note is that this piece focuses on recent graduates, when I say recent I refer to those who graduated in the past four years, primarily when the economic collapse occurred until now. This problem has been pervasive for decades and band-aiding it with non-profit centers while students have nearly mortgage-sized debt and no ability to pay or discharge the debt will not cure the law school malady. Here’s an excerpt:

And it gtimeets worse still. There are a surprising number of job postings for lawyers that offer no salary at all, including government law jobs. That raises the question — as one headline put it — “Would You Work as a Federal Prosecutor — For Free?

Being unemployed — or working at minimum wage — is rough in the best of circumstances. But it is especially crippling for students who get out of school with six-figure debts that are not dischargeable in bankruptcy. The average debt load for law school graduates is now over $100,000 — and at some schools, it tops $150,000.

My favorite part is: Prospective law students are already responding to the dismal job market. Applications to law school are expected to hit a 30-year low this year — down as much as 38% from 2010. Some law schools have responded by shrinking their class sizes, and there have been predictions that in the not-too-distant future some lower-ranked law schools might have to close entirely. (emphasis mine)

Keep it up!, with more  schools closings, more professors will lose their jobs or not make tenure and then the law school administrators and those who tortured us a purveyors of the industry in the name of intellectual pursuit will know how it feels on the other side. The message is beyond clear, it is translucent: Do not go to law school, it simply is not worth it (and stop being rude to those who did years ago, we were trying to make better lives for ourselves but apparently it was based on a lie).

Get the word out, don’t let your son, daughter, sister, brother become a victim of joblessness, insurmountable debt. Just tell them “say no” to law school–they’ll thank you in the long run.

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10 Things Law Schools Won’t Tell You: We reveal why the Juris Doctor isn’t what it used to be.

An article by SmartMoney magazine.  If you believe the following, in particular in reference to a law degree, you’re highly misguided and simply not listening to the CLEAR warnings being issued by the law school scam blogs and now the mainstream media:

“I thought if I got a higher degree, I’d have a better chance to get a job, but that’s not what happened.”

Ha. My favorite part is the caveat emptor, nonchalant ‘you’re stupid enough to believe what we say attitude from one administrator of the Thomas Cooley School of Law. Leave it to an attorney to justify its clients’ deceptive practices and possible violations of civil law. Yes, this is what you deal with in the real world, your supposed bosses, colleagues and mentors will eat you alive as long as they get paid to do it. “…. James Thelen, general counsel at Thomas M. Cooley Law School, says the institution follows the American Bar Association and NALP’s rules when reporting job placement rates, and its web site lists the sectors its graduates have been hired to work in. Separately, he says, colleges can’t predict how an economic downturn will impact job openings. “No reasonable person could look at the accurate data we report about graduate employment today and believe that it is a guarantee that the very same percentage of job opportunities will be available when he or she graduates,” says Thelen.” You hear that? you are being referred to as irrational, lacking sense or the ability to deduce that you will be gainfully employed or employed at all by believing what law school’s official represent in their statistics. Classic.

From the Wall Street Journal to the New York Times and now SmartMoney (this media outlet is designed to inform consumers about financial planning and investments–hint, hint) So if you haven’t received the hint that you should not go to law school, then go ahead, don’t say we didn’t warn you. This is self-explanatory, the rest of the story is here:  10 Things Law Schools Won’t Tell You ; SmartMoney, June 6, 2012.

Congress investigates law schools

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According to the Tennesseean’s article Corporations add transparency; so can universities (02/15/2012). This makes sense. Law schools and other universities conduct themselves as for profit they should have all the regulations and accountability that goes with it. Employment statistics, true rankings, endowments, donations, investments and distribution of funding. The first paragraph of this article makes you mentally say an exclamatory *yes*:

The U.S. Senate is investigating law schools’ student data for accuracy, as evidence grows that public information released misrepresents the truth.

Hopefully, Congress will not address the legal industry like the housing market–lawsuits and settlements and restructure only for those affected since 2008 til present. These institutions of higher education have been gaming the system for decades.

National Law Journal: Accountability and Transparency: Law schools are adapting to the shifting job market

Buyer Beware

This news article Law schools are adapting to the shifting job market (01/24/2012) posted by the National Law Journal discusses the reality of  lawgraduates unemployment, the change in the legal industry and wow, accountability and transparency. The horns and sirens have sounded long enough where the ABA and US News and World Report actually have to tell the truth. The remaining issue, whether federal oversight-the Department of Education will regulate it providing substantive accountability rather than a new way for these accrediting and ranking entities to formulate a new form of ‘smoke and mirrors.’ You may enjoy this part of the article:

The ABA, NALP and U.S. News — under much criticism themselves — have been working to increase, clarify and standardize the employment information they collect from law schools. Within a few short months, the ABA’s most recent changes will be fully in place.

One of the benefits of the new standards is that “employed” graduates will be further classified within subcategories. The ABA and U.S. News no longer will consider both the grad working at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom and the grad working at Starbucks as merely “employed.” Additional breakdowns will funnel them into categories that indicate how many are employed in full-time vs. part-time, professional vs. non-professional, long-term vs. short-term and school-funded positions, and in jobs for which the J.D. provides an advantage.

Lol, let’s see how they would justify tuition once and if these changes are implemented. Buyer beware.

Breaking News (02/03/2012): Law grads go to Court for Bankruptcy Protection

See MSNBC article posted today: Law Grads Go to Court for Bankruptcy Protection. You can tell she was a recent graduate most people

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know that Sallie Mae lobbied Congress in the 1990s to stop allowing student loans from being discharged in bankruptcy. They have the whole legal industry–in their hands…♫ Because Sallie Mae would suffer undue hardship if student loans were discharged. It’s a tax write-off, they won’t lose anything. An indebted, unemployed, graduate, well you being unable to feed yourself, just does not fit within the purview of being important to the federal courts or financial institution. Good day…

My favorite line: “If you did not go to a top 40 law school and finished in the top 25 percent of your class, you’re not going to get one of those jobs,” said Jordan Abshire, principal of attorney recruiting agency Lateral Link. Abshire said that since 2008, he has seen more attorneys with a few years of experience filing for bankruptcy, often carrying a new home mortgage on top of their student loans.

Despite what CNN says the economy is not getting better, especially for law graduates. Another warning to the would be 0L, basically for you to earn enough money to live decently AND be able to pay back your student loans you have to go to a top school. I’m not sure why they said top 40, it’s really Top 10 and even those people are doing contract work. Further buried in the article:

The debt load on students is made worse by the shrinking legal job market. Since January 1, 2008, major law firms have laid off about 5,900 attorneys, according to the Lay-Off tracker at lawshucks.com, a blog that tracks law firm hiring. That is about 5 percent of all attorneys at the 250 largest law firms, according to the National Jaw Journal. (The U.S. Department of Labor does not collect job data on attorneys specifically.)

The truth shall set you free, if you are an 0L it will prevent you from economic slavery.

Law Schools Are Not the Only Ones Paying Employers to Hire

Apparently this past summer the Maryland state government implemented a program called H.I.R.E. Maryland [http://dllr.state.md.us/]. Should you be one of the lucky unemployed Marylanders there is hope:

“Resources for Job Seekers
Maryland’s Hiring Incentive Rebate for Employers (index.shtml) can be used as an incentive to encourage employers to hire unemployed indivisuals.”

Should you be one of the struggling small businesses that are struggling in Maryland due to high business taxes and insurance rates and payments on your Small Business Administration Loan behold the light:

“What is the tax credit?
• The Hiring Incentive Rebate for Employers is a tax credit available to Maryland businesses that hire qualified workers for newly-created or certain vacant positions in the State.
•Employers will receive a maximum credit of $5,000, for each qualified employee, up to $250,000.

How does an employer qualify?
•Employees must be Maryland residents as well as hired between March 25, 2010 and December 31, 2010.
•At the time of hire, individuals must be receiving unemployment insurance benefits or have exhausted their benefits in the previous 12 months and not working full-time immediately preceding the date of hire.
•Positions must be full-time as well as newly-created or have been vacant for at least 6 months.

Where can I get more information?
For more information, visit the DLLRwebsite (index.shtml) or one of the 34 One Stop Career Centers (../employment/onestops.shtml).” [sic]

So employers must create a position in order to get the tax credit. Note that the credit is up to $5,000. This means that the credit can range from $1 to $5,000. I am sure that the conditions are set to ensure that most potential employers won’t receive the maximum. Also, would an employer, especially a small business think it is worth it to create a position for $5,000?
In Maryland most businesses are blue-collar, mall-type or state or local government jobs. So let’s focus on the first two types since the latter aren’t likely included. An average worker probably makes about $25,000-$40,000 a year (I’m being generous in this economy). That means that the owner has to be creative enough to generate MORE business revenue to cover the new employee’s salary in a failing economy, meaning should he/she be unable to the business would actually create an additional debt of $20,000 to $40,000. A small business that is able to generate that much more revenue wouldn’t need the incentive of $5,000.

Any average person in the DC-metro area knows that Maryland has a faltering business or job market. What I find interesting is that when I read economic stress maps or news about the DC area the author continues to make references to market/employment gains.

Maryland is over populated, overdeveloped and over-run by mob transplants ready to pillage whatever resources the state has. Years ago many medical practitioners moved out of Maryland because their medical malpractice insurance was increased to such a level they could not operate any more. Maryland does not have the foresight to attract corporations like northern Virginia does. Maryland seems to be concerned with more condos and mcmansions than how anyone can pay for it. It appears that many workers in Maryland are commuters from Philadelphia and Delaware, while many (professionals) commute to Washington, DC like northern Viriginians for employment. I doubt that this hiring incentive had any real impact for the unemployment rate overall, especially for displaced professionals.

Fleecing State Budgets From West to East Coast: Paying the Price for Law Schools’ New Campuses

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA

This story first ‘broke’ October 29, 2008, with a series of concurrent press releases provided on the law school’s website here: New Campus Goes Live | Thomas Jefferson School of Law. This very first press release: states “We have the funds to complete this project,” Dean Hasl said to the cheers of the audience, acknowledging the turbulent financial climate.[Groundbreaking Story | Thomas Jefferson School of Law]. Interesting how the school decided just at the beginning of the current recession to move forward with plans to build the new campus for the law school. I am confident they do have the money–between state funds and their cut of student loan debt incurred by current and incoming law students.  Yesterday, a news magazine reported on the San Diego law school’s progress to schedule to open in 2011: [

Downtown’s New Law School | San Diego Metro Magazine July 6, 2010] and prior press releases attempts to excite the reader with archeological finds, the technological advanced construction of the building and an irrelevant statement regarding the school’s need to return to its roots:

While that question will require further examination, Rudy Hasl, dean of the 41-year-old law school since 2005, can say for certain that the new law school building — one of the newest structures in East Village — will offer state-of-the-art features that students will find fascinating when classes begin next January. These include a computer center, wireless access and audio video capabilities throughout the eight-story structure, expansive view terraces on the fifth and eighth floors and a roof that supports a 50 kilowatt solar array with 270 modules. The school is seeking LEED Gold certification for the building from the U.S. Green Building Council. Also included are two learning centers, a moot courtroom, two recording studios, five conference rooms, an executive board room and a 40,000-square-foot library with future space for a café, bookstore and a law clinic. Three levels of parking below the building will offer 177 parking spaces.

The Dean even brags about how his school is accredited. That’s a bragging right for a 4th tier school I guess.

Throughout most of these releases and articles, the speaker rarely mentions the benefit to potential law students and graduates and their potential to earn an income from this 4th Tier school [Rankings – Best Law Schools – Graduate Schools – Education – US News and World Report].

From what I have observed, it appears most institutions and companies do not invest in people. They invest in their institutions that are benefitted by people but will use them to the extent the bottom of the toothpast tube is flat, then toss. I often hear people say we need more engineers, but notice that alot of middle, high school and even some undergraduate universities do not invest in this quality education and training so our country becomes more reliant on non-Americans to improve our technologies. Of course, someone will argue that constructing a new building will help motivate new law students by giving them an enhanced educational environment. Yet, some of the most gifted and talented persons are from humble backgrounds, some of the most intelligent ones do not attend school and those who did, the focus was on gaining knowledge with the ability to tap into innovative ideas to improve their communities and economy. This was decades ago, now it seems that we have mistaken rennovation as innovation, that’s why the legal industry hasn’t changed with the times, but has worsened. Instead of taken cost-effective measures for law schools and law students, an elite few have decided that law school is a franchise. Anyway…

 Since these schools are state supported, I was curious as to the extent of state funds were granted to these fine institutions. Before we delve into this, let’s be reminded that according to a recent post at Above the Law, many recent law graduates are flooding government offices to volunteer for 2 available internships in one California county. [ ‘The Job Market Is Even Worse Than Many of Us Thought’ « Above the Law: A Legal Tabloid – News, Gossip, and Colorful Commentary on Law Firms and the Legal Profession]. That’s right, in one of the hardest hit states of the current economic recession, attorneys are flocking to work for free with nearly insurmountable debt has a  STATE funded school spending money on a pretty building, to match its shiny brochures.

When I was researching information concerning this one, I actually lost track of which law school I was researching, but here’s the list:

1. Stanford Law School
2. U.C. Berkeley – Boalt Hall
3. UCLA Law School
4. USC Law School
5. U. California Davis Law School (King Hall)
6. U. California Hastings Law School
7. U. of San Diego Law School
8. Loyola Law School
9. Santa Clara Law School
10. U. of San Francisco
11. Pepperdine Law School
12. U. of the Pacific (McGeorge)
13. Southwestern U. Law School
14. Chapman U. Law School
15. Whittier U. Law School
16. Golden Gate U. Law School
17. California Western Law School
18. Thomas Jefferson Law School

Earlier this year Thomas Jefferson School of Law breaks new ground, San Diego Law School was working to merge with California Western law school. (Let’s point out that according to one source, the Thomas Jefferson School of Law was simply a separate campus of California Western before it decided to become a separate entity). California Western is a for UCSD looking at a law school – SignOnSanDiego.com, January 28, 2010

Critics question whether the school could be self-supporting and whether there’s a mismatch between UCSD’s research focus and California Western’s emphasis on teaching. Some also doubt the need for such a school, considering there are already five UC law schools.

“I think this has more to do with the aspirations of the university than the people of San Diego saying there is a need for it,” said Patrick Callan, president of the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, an independent nonprofit based in San Jose. “If the argument is it eases faculty collaborations, what are the impediments for that collaboration now? The notion that you can’t collaborate unless you’re part of the same entity is absurd.” Even the head of the university disagrees with the law schools merger, though subtle: 

UCSD Chancellor Marye Anne Fox has not taken a position on the partnership, but said the project would only move forward if it enhances legal research while not undermining other university investments. She said it’s important that no public funds be spent on the school, at least for the first several years.“I wouldn’t approve anything in these tight economic times that were not completely self-supporting for the foreseeable future,” Fox said.

It’s like different law schools contract and expands, grows legs and repeat. Let’s focus, who’s paying for this new shiny campus amidst one of California’s most hemmoraghing budget deficit. There is no clear indication where all of the funds are sourced. Since it’s a public law school we’ll have to presume the State of California paid for a certain amount and the rest from endowments and profits made from student loans.

An Article from the Philadelphia Inquirer: Less jobs for law graduates

Philadelphia-area law firms cutting back on summer internships | Philadelphia Inquirer | 07/07/2010 

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Philadelphia-area law firms cutting back on summer internships

By Chris Mondics

Inquirer Staff Writer

For top law school students, summer-internship programs at big, brand-name law firms have helped open the golden door to lucrative full-time employment. The failing legal industry continues to make headline news as IVY League and top tier law graduates have been unable to obtain jobs. No one cares about the tens of thousands of law graduates outside of this limited category. They’ve been dealing with this for years.

But at some firms, that door is starting to swing shut. Many prominent law firms in the Philadelphia region and around the nation report substantially smaller internship programs this summer, as firms cope with the downturn in the legal marketplace and client demands that only seasoned lawyers be assigned to their matters. Just like the federal government, the private sector is relying more on well experienced attorneys sometimes regardless of the name-brand in your portfolio. I’ll surmise that the purpose of this article is saying that since these “top” law graduates are unable to get jobs, the legal job market is pretty dismal. Somewhat of a litmus test perhaps.

What’s more, firms are shortening their programs and paying summer associates less. At least they’re getting paid, and we’ll be sure not to weep for the $10,000 lost in the pay cut. Cry me a river.

The changes range from canceled programs at the Center City firms of Morgan Lewis & Bockius L.L.P. and Ballard Spahr L.L.P. to reduced internships at Dechert L.L.P., Blank Rome L.L.P., and Reed Smith L.L.P., a Pittsburgh-based firm with a 150-lawyer office in Philadelphia.

Dechert went from 99 summer-associate positions at the height of the legal market in 2007 to 36 this year. Reed Smith, a 1,600-lawyer firm, said the number dropped from a high of 81 in 2008 to 21 this year.

“It was definitely a challenging market for our students and they did have fewer choices for this summer,” said Melissa Lennon, assistant dean in the office of career planning at Temple University Law School. “Challenging,” that’s when something is difficult but the goals is still accomplished, it’s more accurate to say nearly insurmountable.

Three years ago, when law firms were booming, the market for summer associates was far more robust. More about the elite group.

Law firms flocked to campuses to compete for top second-year students and brandished salaries as high as $2,700 a week or more.

And, summer associates typically received offers of full-time employment once they had their law degrees.

The programs themselves, with trips abroad and lavish entertaining, could seem more like summer enrichment for precocious college students than real employment.

But as a general rule, that sort of treatment is a thing of the past. Yes, we know. Just to provide some advice, when you’re attempting to lure sympathy from a reader, it’s better not to talk about how associates were spoiled and lived it up and moreso focus on how they were able to meet their basic living expenses with money to save. It is this type of journalism that feeds the non-lawyers lack of empathy when the economy is poor.

More typical is the summer program at the Wilmington office of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom L.L.P., where Temple second-year Nick Mozal is spending his summer in corporate law. Mozal said there has been some entertaining, but the big event so far has been a night at a Phillies game.

He’s just grateful to have summer employment with a big-name firm.  That’s better.

“I feel very lucky, and I was very excited for it to have gone so smoothly,” said Mozal, who did his undergraduate work at Bucknell University and was raised in Exeter, a town in northeast Pennsylvania near Wilkes-Barre. “You can pick up the paper and read lots of stories about firms laying people off and [new hires] being deferred.”

Jennifer Wallace, a summer associate at Duane Morris L.L.P., a 700-lawyer firm, said recruiters had warned during interviews last year that the market for summer positions would be tough. Even so, Wallace, a second-year student at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, received multiple offers.

“The hiring partners and the people affiliated with the process were very up front in terms of what I could expect,” she said.

…James Lawlor, a Reed Smith partner who recruits and hires summer associates, said the firm has been doing less entertaining of summer associates, and when it does, it is more likely to schedule events at the firm’s Center City offices rather than at costly restaurants.

“We took away some of the bells and whistles,” Lawlor said. = unnecessary expenses which had they been spared previous years you might’ve been able to hire more associates in the future, but like the Titanic people thought the legal industry was ‘unsinkable.’

“We had a choice; there was going to be a day of reckoning where we would have two classes joining us in the same period, which struck us as undesirable,” said Geoffrey A. Kahn, a Ballard Spahr partner specializing in commercial litigation and white-collar defense who oversees hiring and recruitment at the firm.

The de-emphasis of internships in Philadelphia tracks national trends. The National Association for Law Placement, a trade association that focuses on the training and recruitment of lawyers, said that for all law firms, the median number of summer-associate positions offered this year had dropped to seven from 10 last year and 15 in 2008.

Moreover, NALP said that firms had been doing fewer on-campus interviews. And when internships are completed, they are making fewer offers of permanent jobs.

“For the class of 2011, those who went through the on-campus interview process last year, there were many fewer summer-associate positions available,” said James Leipold, NALP’s executive director….So the picture is not uniformly bleak.

No, just bleak for the majority of law graduates regardless of school and ranking the stark while irrational optimists attempt to hide the reality of the legal industry as a whole, beyond the current state of the U.S. economy.

Heather Frattone, an associate dean at Penn’s law school, said the school’s entire class of second-year students has managed to find some form of summer law employment, often going to work for the government or small firms…Interesting how they would define this, as whether paid or unpaid, temporary employment, internships, etc.

Summer programs not only give law students practical exposure to the work they will do as full-fledged lawyers, they also serve as key recruiting tools. And that is why they’ve been reduced: Law firms project they will need fewer lawyers over the next several years. [emphasis mine].  Translate, over the next SEVERAL years firms and other businesses will not hire attorneys, the legal industry continues to shrink! In other words, there will be no jobs for you! So why are you getting into debt with false hopes. Members of the industry are now telling you straight up there aren’t hardly any jobs and won’t be for the projected long-term.

But that doesn’t make the programs any less essential, said Alfred Putnam, chairman of Drinker Biddle, which has instituted a novel training program for first-year lawyers aimed at providing practical exposure before they are assigned to client matters – and before their time is billed to clients. Essential for whatever clientele and firms that are left and when convenient you will be squeezed out of a job as with any pecking order, except it will likely be sooner than later.

“I am happy we still have a summer-associate program and I am happy we are still hiring,” he said. “Unless you bring in new blood, the institution doesn’t survive.” At this point the legal industry needs a blood transfusion.

Batting 10,000

You the readers have reached over the 10,000 mark for number of hits. Although this blog is new, I am going to assume that there are so many people who are hearing the message or experiencing the aftermath of the law school industry. Hopefully, the message continues to spread. Say no to law school and yes to your sanity…

The Legal Industry: Media attention to the “Law Degree No Guarantee for Job”

Did someone just awaken from a stupor after eating the apple from the nice old lady? First it was Georgetown law students with NPR with their confessionals of dismal employment outlooks upon graduation, now Michigan State University law dean admits it. The interesting question is why are they admitting it only when it’s time for the harvest of the next crop of graduates to hit the job market? It was getting bad during their 1Ls wasn’t it? Anyway here’s the article stint entitled:

Law degree no guarantee for jobs, fresh off the online presses-May 31, 2010 [http://www.lansingstatejournal.com/article/20100531/NEWS03/5310316/Law-degree-no-guarantee-for-jobs] It’s not an intellectually stimulating piece, just a short reminder of what most of these blogs have been telling people, the job market for lawyers is awful and there is no real hope of it improving and you will most likely be working outside of the legal field unless you’re volunteering or doing document review: “According to research conducted by the Association for Legal Career Professionals, all measures of employment growth for new lawyers in 2009 decreased.” I’m not sure whether this statement means measures of whether a recent law graduate entered into the legal field with a secured job upon graduation, specifically whether it was at a law firm, public interest or government, or measuring the actually salary of law graduates or a combination of these factors plus others. Just to assume that the just mentioned variables were calculated, the legal industry is abismal, yet law schools are graduating more and more lawyers into this field? !

It next reads: “In 2008, only 89.9 percent of lawyers coming into the field found employment, which was a decrease from a high of 91.9 percent in 2007, said Judith Collins, research director for the association.” This is the power of words, because ONLY 89.9% found employment? I let you navigate to Exposing the Law School Scam and Third Tier Reality for the mathematical calculations regarding statistics published by NALP, AALS and whoever else. This simply cannot be. Between what the federal government and even more of the mainstream media reports this cannot be accurate. Asides that out of this alleged percentage the article does not state whether these newly minted lawyers even found work in the legal industry. In other words, they may very well be working at a department store, fast food restaurant, manual labor, seasonal mall work, etc. I remember reading in one of the other blogs that some recent graduates are hired by the law school immediately just to heighten the appearance of their law graduate statistics! Simply amazing. Yet, yet…people want to go to law school, it’s like you’re saying with this now available information: “When I grow up I want to be unemployed, stressed, overburdened with debt and have postponed having a family or a real chance at have a good quality of life.” Anyway…it further states

“For instance, the Department of Homeland Security has been hiring law graduates to work in their offices reviewing documents, even though a law degree isn’t required.” You see now instead of the embarrassment and stigma of being a document reviewer in the private law firms, you have the opportunity to be a document reviewer for a government job, though no job title is provided in this piece. Isn’t it just wonderful? Oops wait a minute: “”These are students that are willing to start at the bottom of a rung in a non-attorney job…” Wow, even in the private sector you’re still dubbed an attorney even a contractual one, here you don’t even have that level of ‘prestige’, interesting. The rest is just putting the burden on the recent graduate with a good luck, we cannot help you, it’s all on you.

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